Forty Days of What? On Doing God's Will Instead Of My Own

I slipped away recently for a women's retreat and while in a “prayerful” state, I decided to list my Lenten resolutions, the sacrifices I would offer during the fourty-seven days in the desert.

While comfortably nestled in front of the Blessed Sacrament, I tore open my floral covered journal, wielded my Bic pen and scribbled all the ways I would deny myself during the upcoming penitential season.

 It was an impressive list, if I do say so myself, and it included all the important elements necessary for a good Lent--prayer, fasting, and alms giving.

When I laid my head on the pillow that night, I was pleased I had the forethought to pen such fantastic ways to sacrifice.  My smug, self-congratulatory attitude should have set off loud sirens inside the walls of that Franciscan convent, but it didn't.  It was only the next morning during Mass, when I realized I forgot to ask God if He liked my Lenten list. 

Fourty Days of What? On Doing God's Will Instead Of My Own by Colleen Duggan

So, right after the homily and right before the Consecration, I requested God’s input.  The answer came immediately and clearly.

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Integrated Catholic Life

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I slipped away recently for a women’s retreat and while in a “prayerful” state, I decided to list my Lenten resolutions, the sacrifices I would offer during the forty-seven days in the desert.  While comfortably nestled in front of the Blessed Sacrament, I tore open my floral covered journal, wielded my Bic pen and scribbled all the ways I would deny myself during the upcoming penitential season.

It was an impressive list, if I do say so myself, and it included all the important elements necessary for a good Lent — prayer, fasting, and almsgiving.  When I laid my head on the pillow that night, I was pleased with myself for having the forethought to pen such fantastic ways to sacrifice.  My smug, self-congratulatory attitude should have set off loud sirens inside the walls of that Franciscan convent, but it didn’t.  It was only the next morning during Mass, when I realized I forgot to ask God if He liked my Lenten list.

So, right after the homily and right before the Consecration, I requested God’s input.  The answer came immediately and clearly.

- See more at: http://www.integratedcatholiclife.org/2014/03/duggan-40-days-of-what-on-doing-gods-will-instead-of-my-own/#sthash.1SMBpcJM.dpuf

I slipped away recently for a women’s retreat and while in a “prayerful” state, I decided to list my Lenten resolutions, the sacrifices I would offer during the forty-seven days in the desert.  While comfortably nestled in front of the Blessed Sacrament, I tore open my floral covered journal, wielded my Bic pen and scribbled all the ways I would deny myself during the upcoming penitential season.

It was an impressive list, if I do say so myself, and it included all the important elements necessary for a good Lent — prayer, fasting, and almsgiving.  When I laid my head on the pillow that night, I was pleased with myself for having the forethought to pen such fantastic ways to sacrifice.  My smug, self-congratulatory attitude should have set off loud sirens inside the walls of that Franciscan convent, but it didn’t.  It was only the next morning during Mass, when I realized I forgot to ask God if He liked my Lenten list.

So, right after the homily and right before the Consecration, I requested God’s input.  The answer came immediately and clearly.

- See more at: http://www.integratedcatholiclife.org/2014/03/duggan-40-days-of-what-on-doing-gods-will-instead-of-my-own/#sthash.1SMBpcJM.dpuf